Disabled? You Can Still Exercise!

Written by MCJStaff   // September 25, 2013   // 0 Comments

blackdoctor.org

By Ellis Moore

Being disabled or having chronic pain or illness makes exercise difficult if not impossible. But don’t lose hope. Exercise can be performed by just about everyone—including individuals with limited mobility. In fact, those who suffer from joint problems, weight issues, injury, or illness will find great benefit in performing regular physical activity.

Exercise not only helps control weight and strengthens muscles, but it reduces the risk of various diseases, boosts energy, strengthens bones, lengthens the life span, improves mood, sex life, sleep patterns and may even help prevent or manage addictions–whether they be to drugs, food, or anything else.

With a little creativity and dedication, physical activity can become part of anyone’s lifestyle. Here’s how:

What Types Of Exercise Are Possible With A Disability?

It’s important to remember that any type of exercise will offer health benefits. Mobility issues inevitably make some types of exercise easier than others, but no matter your physical situation, you should aim to incorporate three different types of exercise into your routines:

  1. Cardiovascular exercises that raise your heart rate and increase your endurance. These can include walking, running, cycling, dancing, tennis, swimming, water aerobics, or “aquajogging”. Many people with mobility issues find exercising in water especially beneficial as it supports the body and reduces the risk of muscle or joint discomfort. Even if you’re confined to a chair or wheelchair, it’s still possible to perform cardiovascular exercise.
  2. Strength training exercises involve using weights or other resistance to build muscle and bone mass, improve balance, and prevent falls. If you have limited mobility in your legs, your focus will be on upper body strength training. Similarly, if you have a shoulder injury, for example, your focus will be more on strength training your legs and abs.
  3. Flexibility exercises help enhance your range of motion, prevent injury, and reduce pain and stiffness. These may include stretching exercises and yoga. Even if you have limited mobility in your legs, for example, you may still benefit from stretches and flexibility exercises to prevent or delay further muscle atrophy.

First, Talk To Your Doctor

Your doctor or physical therapist can help you find a suitable exercise routine. Ask:

  • How much exercise can I do each day and each week?
  • What type of exercise should I do?
  • What exercises or activities should I avoid?
  • Should I take medication at a certain time around my exercise routine?

How To Exercise With Limited Mobility

1. Starting an exercise routine

  • Start slow and gradually increase your activity level. Start with an activity you enjoy, go at your own pace, and keep your goals manageable. Accomplishing even the smallest fitness goals will help you gain body confidence and keep you motivated.
  • Make exercise part of your daily life. Plan to exercise at the same time every day and combine a variety of exercises to keep you from getting bored.
  • Stick with it. It takes about a month for a new activity to become a habit. Write down your reasons for exercising and a list of goals and post them somewhere visible to keep you motivated. Focus on short-term goals, such as improving your mood and reducing stress, rather than goals such as weight loss, which can take longer to achieve. It’s easier to stay motivated if you enjoy what you’re doing, so find ways to make exercise fun. Listen to music or watch a TV show while you workout, or exercise with friends.
  • Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. It happens. Just get started again and slowly build up to your old momentum.

2. Staying safe when exercising

  • Stop exercising if you experience pain, discomfort, nausea, dizziness, lightheadedness, chest pain, irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, or clammy hands. Listening to your body is the best way to avoid injury.
  • Avoid activity involving an injured body part. If you have an upper body injury, exercise your lower body while the injury heals, and vice versa. When exercising after an injury has healed, start back slowly, using lighter weights and less resistance
  • Warm up, stretch, and cool down. Warm up with a few minutes of light activity such as walking, arm swinging, and shoulder rolls, followed by some light stretching (avoid deep stretches when your muscles are cold). After your exercise routine, whether it’s cardiovascular, strength training, or flexibility exercise, cool down with a few more minutes of light activity and deeper stretching.
  • Drink plenty of water. Your body performs best when it’s properly hydrated.
  • Wear appropriate clothing, such as supportive footwear and comfortable clothing that won’t restrict your movement.


Tags:

disability

exercise

healthy life style


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