Do you have a Dyslexic Child? You Could Also Have Dyslexia

Written by admin   // October 12, 2011   // 0 Comments

98% Of Children With Dyslexia Have A Parent Who Is Dyslexic

Baltimore, MD – A new school year has recently begun and you may notice your child struggling with his or her coursework. However, they may not be the only ones struggling, 98% of children with dyslexia have a parent who is dyslexic.

Dyslexia is a language learning-based difference, which effects up to 10% of the population. Dyslexia occurs in people of all backgrounds and intellectual levels, and has no relation to economic status or intelligence. Dyslexia runs in families and many parents of dyslexic children also have the disorder, but have not been formally diagnosed. Here are 10 questions to ask yourself, and if you answer yes to 7 or more you may have dyslexia.

  1. Do you read slowly?

  2. Did you have trouble learning how to read when you were in school?

  3. Do you often have to read something two or three times before it makes sense?

  4. Are you uncomfortable reading out loud?

  5. Do you omit, transpose, or add letters when you are reading or writing?

  6. Do you find you still have spelling mistakes in your writing even after Spell Check?

  7. Do you find it difficult to pronounce uncommon multi-syllable words when you are reading?

  8. Do you choose to read magazine or shore articles rather than longer books and novels?

  9. When you were in school, did you find it extremely difficult to learn a foreign language?

  10. Do you avoid work projects or courses that require extensive reading?

If you think you may have the signs of dyslexia, you may want to consider seeking consultation from a specialist or a formal diagnostic assessment from a qualified examiner. For more information about dyslexia and to find a dyslexia specialist in your area please visit the IDA’s website www.interdys.org.

About the International Dyslexia Association:

The International Dyslexia Associationis a non-profit, scientific, and educational organization dedicated to the study and treatment of dyslexia as well as related language-based learning differences. The IDA operates 45 branches throughout the United States and Canada and has global partners in eighteen countries, including Australia, Brazil, England, Germany, Ireland, and Japan.

For additional information please contact Colleen Riopko of Barb Clapp Advertising and Marketing at (410) 561-8886 or via email at [email protected].

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Baltimore, MD – A new school year has recently begun and you may notice your child struggling with his or her coursework. However, they may not be the only ones struggling, 98% of children with dyslexia have a parent who is dyslexic.

Dyslexia is a language learning-based difference, which effects up to 10% of the population. Dyslexia occurs in people of all backgrounds and intellectual levels, and has no relation to economic status or intelligence. Dyslexia runs in families and many parents of dyslexic children also have the disorder, but have not been formally diagnosed. Here are 10 questions to ask yourself, and if you answer yes to 7 or more you may have dyslexia.

  1. Do you read slowly?
  2. Did you have trouble learning how to read when you were in school?
  3. Do you often have to read something two or three times before it makes sense?
  4. Are you uncomfortable reading out loud?
  5. Do you omit, transpose, or add letters when you are reading or writing?
  6. Do you find you still have spelling mistakes in your writing even after Spell Check?
  7. Do you find it difficult to pronounce uncommon multi-syllable words when you are reading?
  8. Do you choose to read magazine or shore articles rather than longer books and novels?
  9. When you were in school, did you find it extremely difficult to learn a foreign language?
  10. Do you avoid work projects or courses that require extensive reading?

If you think you may have the signs of dyslexia, you may want to consider seeking consultation from a specialist or a formal diagnostic assessment from a qualified examiner. For more information about dyslexia and to find a dyslexia specialist in your area please visit the IDA’s website www.interdys.org.

 


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