Incident cast glaring light on community’s disunity

Written by admin   // April 15, 2010   // 0 Comments

MCJ EDITORIAL

We didn’t know who to be more outraged with when a friend of this newspaper tried to be a “Good Samaritan” Tuesday and come to the aid of a young lady being punched and dragged along the sidewalk on M.L. King Drive by her alleged “boyfriend.”

Should we be outraged at the Milwaukee Police who reportedly took forever to respond to the domestic violence situation?

Should we be outraged to learn that the police, once they arrived on the scene, reportedly ignored and declined to take the statements of our friend and another witness—both African Americans—who called 911, preferring instead to take the statement of a White male witness who also phoned in about the incident.

According to our friend, the White witness got most of the details of what happened wrong, including the description of the assailant.

As if the treatment of the two Black witnesses wasn’t insulting enough, what really rankled us and our friend, was the fact that other Black passersby, (either walking nearby or driving past in their cars), saw the assault and did nothing to intervene on behalf of the woman.

The lack of concern and seeming apathy demonstrated by some of our own people who witnessed the domestic assault is an example of just how, to a certain extent, our community has “de-evolved” and lost its way morally and spiritually.

We seem to have lost our pride, concern and willingness to intervene and help those who are in need of aid and comfort.

Simply put, we have lost our sense of what it means to be a COMMUNITY! A village of unity. Many of our neighborhoods have become nothing more than “’hoods” where we “hang-out” and live in fear and loathing of each other.

Perhaps the lack of action on Tuesday by citizens who saw what happened is the fall-out from the “No-Snitching” mentality that permeates the negative side of the “Hip-Hop Generation” and, sadly, those born years before.

Too many of us turn our heads away from behavior that we know is wrong and/or immoral, not to mention against the law, for fear of being accused of sticking our noses where it doesn’t belong, or of “betraying” some “code of the streets,” or fear of retaliation by the perpetrator if the police fail to apprehend him or her.

Those individuals in our community who have lost their moral compass, must find a way to right their personal ship so that it is moving in the direction of what must ultimately be the final destination of all of Black America, the “promised land” of unity, spirituality, morals, values, self-respect, and a respect for the law when it is applied equally and without bias.


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