New Jersey Election Results: Cory Booker Wins Special Election For Senate

Written by MCJStaff   // October 17, 2013   // 0 Comments

Newark Mayor Corey Booker greets people at the Hoboken PATH station after winning the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate on August 14, 2013 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Booker will face off in a special October election against Republican challenger former Bogota, NJ mayor Steve Lonegan to fill the empty U.S. Senate seat left formerly held by U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died on June 3rd. (Photo by Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images)

AP/The Huffington Post

Democrat Cory Booker has won the race against Republican Steve Lonegan to be the next U.S. Senator from New Jersey.

Booker, currently serving as mayor of Newark, was declared the winner by the AP Wednesday night. He will take the seat of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D), who died in June.

After casting his vote early on Wednesday, Booker said his race against Lonegan “is the only election in America right now where we will get a chance to make a statement about what is going on in Washington.

“This is a chance for us to send a message about the shutdown, about the gridlock, about all those forces that my opponent represents — the tea party — that says we shouldn’t compromise, we shouldn’t work together,” Booker said.

The election is the first since the federal government shut down more than two weeks ago. Results came hours after Senate leaders announced a deal had been struck to reopen the government and avert a Treasury default.

During his campaign, Lonegan touted his conservative ties, rallying for votes with former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R)

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Newark Mayor Cory Booker won a special election Wednesday to represent New Jersey in the U.S. Senate, giving the rising Democratic star a bigger political stage after a race against conservative Steve Lonegan, a former small-town mayor.

Booker, 44, will become the first black senator from New Jersey and heads to Washington with an unusual political resume. He was raised in suburban Harington Park as the son of two of the first black IBM executives, and graduated from Stanford and law school at Yale with a stint in between as a Rhodes Scholar before moving to one of Newark’s toughest neighborhoods with the intent of doing good.

He’s been an unconventional politician, a vegetarian with a Twitter following of 1.4 million — or five times the population of the city he governs. With dwindling state funding, he has used private fundraising, including a $100 million pledge from Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, to run programs in Newark, a strategy that has brought his city resources and him both fame and criticism.

Booker was elected to complete the 15 months remaining on the term of Frank Lautenberg, whose death in June at age 89 gave rise to an unusual and abbreviated campaign. If he wants to keep the seat for a full six-year term — and all indications are that he does — Booker will be on the ballot again in November 2014.

Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican with a national following of his own, appointed his attorney general, Jeffrey Chiesa, to the Senate temporarily and scheduled a special election for a Wednesday just 20 days before Christie himself is on the ballot seeking re-election. Christie said he wanted to give voters a say as soon as legally possible.

Democrats challenged the timing, saying Christie was afraid of appearing on the same ballot as the popular Booker. But courts upheld the governor’s election schedule.

Booker had a running start on the election. Before Lautenberg died, Booker passed up a chance to run against Christie this year, saying he was eyeing Lautenberg’s seat in 2014, in part so he could complete a full term as mayor — something he won’t do now that he’s heading to Washington.

He won an August primary against an experienced Democratic field including two members of Congress and the speaker of the state Assembly in a campaign that was largely about ideas.

The general election was about deeper contrasts, both ideological and personal.

Lonegan stepped down as New Jersey director of the anti-tax, pro-business Americans for Prosperity to run. Lonegan, who is legally blind, got national attention as mayor of the town of Bogota when he tried to get English made its official language.

After two runs in Republican gubernatorial primaries and as the leader of successful campaigns against ballot measures to raise a state sales tax and fund stem-cell research, Lonegan was a favorite of New Jersey’s relatively small right wing.

The two candidates portrayed each other as too extreme for the job.

Throughout the campaign, Lonegan was aggressive, criticizing Booker during a string of homicides in Newark, holding a red carpet event in rally to mock the time Booker spent fundraising in California and declaring that “New Jersey needs a leader, not a tweeter.”

Lonegan also criticized Booker when a Portland, Ore., stripper revealed a series of not-so-salacious Twitter messages she’d exchanged with Booker, who’s single. The topic resurfaced last week when Lonegan fired a key adviser after a profane interview in which the adviser suggested Booker’s words were “like what a gay guy would say to a stripper.”

Lonegan had called it “strange” that Booker won’t say whether he’s gay. Booker, for his part, has said his sexuality should not matter to voters and has been elusive on the subject.

At a debate this month, Lonegan responded to Booker’s comments about the need for environmental regulations to clean a river through Newark. “You may not be able to swim in that river,” he said. “But it’s probably, I think, because of all the bodies floating around of shooting victims in your city.”

Booker seemed stunned at the remark, and his campaign has criticized Lonegan for it.


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