Stars honor Prince at Carnegie Hall tribute

Written by admin   // March 10, 2013   // 0 Comments

D’angelo, Bilal, The Roots, Talib Kweli and more ripped the stage celebrating his Purple Majesty.

Tears welled up in the eyes of pixieish jazz singer Kat Edmonson by the end of “The Beautiful Ones,” which she rendered with a pianist whose plaintive playing was already to cry for. The Purple Rain ballad was easily the night’s most arresting moment. And yet: the bluesy, soulful Alice Smith approached “Pop Life” acoustically with her perfect compliment—the bluesy, soulful Citizen Cope—mining the melancholy despair of someone putting their “million dollar check in someone else’s box” (Prince’s all-time best double entendre). DeVotchKa, Bhiman, Edmonson and Smith weighted Prince’s lyrical verses and emotional heft over his grooves. It worked.

With the 22-song set over halfway done, highlights still came fast and furiously. MC Talib Kweli made Controversy’s “Annie Christian” his own by inserting the names of Tupac Shakur, Trayvon Martin and other violence victims in Prince’s plea for gun control. Chris Rock inserted himself in Prince’s spoken outro to “If I Was Your Girlfriend” (“Could I tickle you so hard you’d laugh and laugh… like you just heard some motherfu–ing Chris Rock?!”). And 67-year-old soul singer Bettye LaVette added some cheeky profanity of her own to “Kiss.”

Maya Rudolph (daughter of the late R&B great Minnie Riperton, needless to say) returned, her pregnant belly protruding out from a Dirty Mind-era trench coat, to rip into “Darling Nikki” with a sexy, comical seriousness. Bilal—who left OMG memories with New Yorkers with his “International Lover” cover at Brooklyn’s BAM Café back in 1999—freaked many different musical movements in a genre mashup with The Roots on “Sister,” Prince’s infamous ode to incest. British rock legend Elvis Costello put his spin on a song only familiar to hardcore Prince bootleggers, the apocalyptic 1999 outtake, “Moonbeam Levels.”

And then… D’Angelo.

The formerly embattled soul singer arrived lucid and loosey-goosey, jumping in from offstage a few verses into Prince’s Sign o’ the Times rave-up, “It’s Gonna Be a Beautiful Night.” Less creatively interpretive than most of the other artistes of the night, D’Angelo played it like a fan singing to himself in the shower over the past 26 years. Still everyone stood, grooving side-to-side, throwing hands in the air. Finally “1999” brought the entire cast onstage 

Tears welled up in the eyes of pixieish jazz singer Kat Edmonson by the end of “The Beautiful Ones,” which she rendered with a pianist whose plaintive playing was already to cry for. The Purple Rain ballad was easily the night’s most arresting moment. And yet: the bluesy, soulful Alice Smith approached “Pop Life” acoustically with her perfect compliment—the bluesy, soulful Citizen Cope—mining the melancholy despair of someone putting their “million dollar check in someone else’s box” (Prince’s all-time best double entendre). DeVotchKa, Bhiman, Edmonson and Smith weighted Prince’s lyrical verses and emotional heft over his grooves. It worked.

With the 22-song set over halfway done, highlights still came fast and furiously. MC Talib Kweli made Controversy’s “Annie Christian” his own by inserting the names of Tupac Shakur, Trayvon Martin and other violence victims in Prince’s plea for gun control. Chris Rock inserted himself in Prince’s spoken outro to “If I Was Your Girlfriend” (“Could I tickle you so hard you’d laugh and laugh… like you just heard some motherfu–ing Chris Rock?!”). And 67-year-old soul singer Bettye LaVette added some cheeky profanity of her own to “Kiss.”

Maya Rudolph (daughter of the late R&B great Minnie Riperton, needless to say) returned, her pregnant belly protruding out from a Dirty Mind-era trench coat, to rip into “Darling Nikki” with a sexy, comical seriousness. Bilal—who left OMG memories with New Yorkers with his “International Lover” cover at Brooklyn’s BAM Café back in 1999—freaked many different musical movements in a genre mashup with The Roots on “Sister,” Prince’s infamous ode to incest. British rock legend Elvis Costello put his spin on a song only familiar to hardcore Prince bootleggers, the apocalyptic 1999 outtake, “Moonbeam Levels.”

And then… D’Angelo.

The formerly embattled soul singer arrived lucid and loosey-goosey, jumping in from offstage a few verses into Prince’s Sign o’ the Times rave-up, “It’s Gonna Be a Beautiful Night.” Less creatively interpretive than most of the other artistes of the night, D’Angelo played it like a fan singing to himself in the shower over the past 26 years. Still everyone stood, grooving side-to-side, throwing hands in the air. Finally “1999” brought the entire cast onstage 


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