The Nation’s Most Segregated Schools Aren’t Where You’d Think They’d Be

Written by MCJStaff   // March 26, 2014   // 0 Comments

 

Little Rock, Arkansas, September 23, 1957 - Showing  Elizabeth Eckford (2), one of the African-American students integrating Central High School. Crowd of hostile and curious onlookers. (1) is Arthur J. Bickle. (Photo by PhotoQuest/Getty Images)

Little Rock, Arkansas, September 23, 1957 – Showing Elizabeth Eckford (2), one of the African-American students integrating Central High School. Crowd of hostile and curious onlookers. (1) is Arthur J. Bickle.
(Photo by PhotoQuest/Getty Images)

 

Joy Resmovits  -The Huffington Post

NEW YORK — The nation’s most segregated schools aren’t in the deep south — they’re in New York, according to a report released Tuesday by the University of California, Los Angeles’ Civil Rights Project.

That means that in 2009, black and Latino students in New York “had the highest concentration in intensely-segregated public schools,” in which white students made up less than 10 percent of enrollment and “the lowest exposure to white students,” wrote John Kucsera, a UCLA researcher, and Gary Orfield, a UCLA professor and the project’s director. “For several decades, the state has been more segregated for blacks than any Southern state, though the South has a much higher percent of African American students,” the authors wrote. The report, “New York State’s Extreme School Segregation,” looked at 60 years of data up to 2010, from various demographics and other research.

There’s also a high level of “double segregation,” Orfield said in an interview, as students are increasingly isolated not only by race, but also by income: the typical black or Latino student in New York state attends a school with twice as many low-income students as their white peers. That concentration of poverty brings schools disadvantages that mixed-income schools often lack: health issues, mobile populations, entrenched violence and teachers who come from the least selective training programs. “They don’t train kids to work in a society that’s diverse by race and class,” he said. “There’s a systematically unequal set of demands on those schools.”

View original article here.


Tags:

Civil Rights Project

Gary Orfield

School Desegregation

School Integration

Ucla Civil Rights Project

Which State Has the Most Segregated Schools


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