Judge grants temporary injunction against law, prohibits application of law in presidential primary

Written by admin   // March 8, 2012   // 0 Comments

by MCJ Staff

A Dane County circuit court judge has granted a temporary injunction Tuesday against Wisconsin’s new Voter ID law. The injunction prohibits the application of the law in the April 3 presidential primary election.

The injunction is seen as a victory by the Milwaukee Branch of the NAACP and Voices de la Frontera, a immigration rights group. Both organizations filed the lawsuit that was granted on Tuesday by Circuit Court Judge David Flanagan. A trial on a permanent injunction is set for April 16.

NAACP Milwaukee, Voces de la Frontera and other individual plaintiffs held a press conference to discuss the significance of Judge Flanagan’s order issued. The press conference was held Tuesday at St. Mark’s AME Church, which was founded by Ezekiel Gillespie, the plaintiff in Gillespie v. Palmer, an 1866 Wisconsin Supreme Court case which first established the right to vote for African-Americans in Wisconsin. 

The attorney for the NAACP, Richard Saks, said Flanagan’s decision was a victory for voting rights and Wisconsin voters, many of whom have difficulty or find it impossible to get voter ID under the current state law, which went into effect last month.

In a written statement, Alderwoman Milele Coggs said, the injunction is “a significant victory for thousands of state voters who would have been disenfranchised in April’s local spring general and presidential primary elections. “

Coggs noted that information generated by legislation she sponsored along with Aldermen Ashanti Hamilton and Terry Witkowski was entered as evidence for consideration prior to the judge’s decision.

Coggs, Hamilton and Witkowski sponsored legislation requiring the city Election Commission to track data on persons turned away from or not able to register at the polls for voter identification reasons.

Said Coggs: “The data on people turned away from the polls or not allowed to register because of the ID issue was critical in demonstrating the potentially powerful negative impact of the ill-conceived Voter ID Law.”

There are currently four lawsuits against the voter ID law.

Voter ID law halted

Judge grants temporary injunction against law, prohibits application of law in presidential primary

by MCJ Staff

A Dane County circuit court judge has granted a temporary injunction Tuesday against Wisconsin’s new Voter ID law. The injunction prohibits the application of the law in the April 3 presidential primary election.

The injunction is seen as a victory by the Milwaukee Branch of the NAACP and Voices de la Frontera, a immigration rights group. Both organizations filed the lawsuit that was granted on Tuesday by Circuit Court Judge David Flanagan. A trial on a permanent injunction is set for April 16.

NAACP Milwaukee, Voces de la Frontera and other individual plaintiffs held a press conference to discuss the significance of Judge Flanagan’s order issued. The press conference was held Tuesday at St. Mark’s AME Church, which was founded by Ezekiel Gillespie, the plaintiff in Gillespie v. Palmer, an 1866 Wisconsin Supreme Court case which first established the right to vote for African-Americans in Wisconsin. 

The attorney for the NAACP, Richard Saks, said Flanagan’s decision was a victory for voting rights and Wisconsin voters, many of whom have difficulty or find it impossible to get voter ID under the current state law, which went into effect last month.

In a written statement, Alderwoman Milele Coggs said, the injunction is “a significant victory for thousands of state voters who would have been disenfranchised in April’s local spring general and presidential primary elections. “

Coggs noted that information generated by legislation she sponsored along with Aldermen Ashanti Hamilton and Terry Witkowski was entered as evidence for consideration prior to the judge’s decision.

Coggs, Hamilton and Witkowski sponsored legislation requiring the city Election Commission to track data on persons turned away from or not able to register at the polls for voter identification reasons.

Said Coggs: “The data on people turned away from the polls or not allowed to register because of the ID issue was critical in demonstrating the potentially powerful negative impact of the ill-conceived Voter ID Law.”

There are currently four lawsuits against the voter ID law.


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